Handsdry.com

A english-norwegian blog on everything you need to know about hyperhidrosis

Month: January 2018

That time i made a sweaty fool of my self at the dentist

I’m going to tell you about this one time that I really made a fool out of my self. Because of my extreme hand and face sweating I have always been a bit nervous about visiting the dentist. It’s like it’s not enough having hyperhidrosis, god had to give me an extreme fear of dentists and a high blood pressure. I always take a few weeks before deciding to visit a dental clinic. It’s a struggle! I google dentists, I check out articles of overcoming dental fear, I send embarrassing emails to the dentist of choice and ask if they can do their business in my home (they can’t). After all this I finally get the courage to schedule a time online at this dental clinic in Oslo. (By the way, I only do this when my teeth are hurting so much that I basically can’t concentrate on anything else.) So I schedule a time for root canal treatment. I know this because the seal of the tooth that I previously treated has fallen off and the tooth is once again rotten inside. I know, this sounds awful. But nothing compared to the pain.

The day of reckoning finally arrives and I need to challenge all my fears and go to the dentist. I try to be there exactly at the right time. I even call before to make sure that they aren’t late. I go in. My hands are already sweating, but I feel like I have everything under control. I go in, say hi and sit down on the dental chair. The dentist knows that I’m not happy to be there, so she tries to get on with it. The dentist colleague comes in and now they are two in the room with me, the scared sweaty guy. The dentist gives me sedation and we’re good to go.

But this is where things start to go wrong. My hands are sweating, my black shirts is soaked under the arms and my face starts flooding. They push a tool in my mouth and it starts bleeding. I try to do some amateur mediation in my head but nothing works. I panic. I ask for them to stop and give me a few minutes. So they look at each other and step out of the room. I, a 28 year old grown up, start acting like a child and try to escape from the window. Thankfully they come in while I have one leg out of the window and got stuck with my jeans in a hook under the window. They start laughing and I start laughing and somehow the whole situation just solves it self.

So there you have it. Embarrassing, but now I have a dentist for life. They understand me.

What i thought i was going to do 🙂

How hyperhidrosis effects people in their daily lives –

I’m not the first or last person with hyperhidrosis. Neither are you. During the years i’ve read so many people write and tell about their condition. I think reading below allows you to feel little bit more normal.

“I didn’t know that there was a name for this problem. I thought that it was just me and that I couldn’t do anything about it. Even my doctor told me, You are just going to have to learn to live with it.”

“I no longer want to be involved in school activities. It’s just too embarrassing because I’ll break out in sweat without warning. My buddies think that I’m nervous and anxious.”

“I used to be the student body president until my facial blush became so severe that I just couldn’t go on.”

“I spend less time with my friends because of the constant anxiety that I have over my sweating.”

“While studying to be a chef at a New York City culinary school, I was almost fired after they accused me of spitting into the batter. It’s just that my hands were dripping with sweat.”

“My girlfriend once grabbed me by my shirt and asked me, Why don’t you touch me? I was afraid that my cold and clammy hands would turn her off. After I told her about my condition, she said that she understood.”

“Dating is almost out of the question because of my condition.”

“I didn’t go to my high school prom. This is just one more thing that I missed out on.”

“I am a student in college, and I don’t want to go out in public to meet men because I am afraid that they may get repulsed by my sweating.”

“At the last minute, I almost didn’t go to college. My mom forced me to go. I didn’t want to go to a new place only to get embarrassed before new strangers.”

“My four year old doesn’t want me to hold his hands. He said that he didn’t like holding my wet hands.”

“I even sweat when I’m alone at home. I may be watching a movie or reading a book and suddenly I start to sweat.”

“I make sure that I am the last one into a conference room or to church and the first one out. This way I don’t have to meet people and embarrass myself by shaking hands with them.”

“Two days before my wedding, I had an anxiety attack. After visualizing walking down the aisle, the ring ceremony and the reception line, I panicked and called off the wedding. My hands and face would have been dripping with sweat. That relationship is now over.”

“I almost called off attending my best friend’s wedding where I was to be the maid of honor. I knew that I would ruin the dress, that my hands would cause people to flinch and then they would have to try to be polite.”


“My husband is a minister and the congregation accused me of being snobbish because I appeared reserved. I did everything to avoid shaking hands with them.”

“I stand out in a crowd because my face glows red from facial blushing. People think that I am either sick or extremely anxious.”

“I find that I now take fewer risks in my life because of my condition. It is as if I’ve created a glass ceiling.”

“I’m a computer programmer and my sweating hands drip sweat onto the keyboard.”

“I rust my tools at the machine shop.”

“I’ve gone through life with this problem, gotten my law degree and developed a successful practice, but now I just want to get rid of this thing.”

“I have to hold my baby with a towel or I may drop him because of my wet hands.”

“No one really understands what this condition does to me, not even my parents.”

“I’ve blown job interviews and sales because of my sweating.”

“My armpits are always wet and there are many clothes that I can’t wear.”

“I changed my college major because of my sweating hands. I wanted to be an artist but I kept staining my artwork with my sweat, so I became a school teacher.”

“My husband complains that I don’t touch him at night, but my hands are cold and wet and I know that it would bother him.”

“Presenting before people is always the worst of times. My face will glow red. The audience must think that I’m extremely nervous or that I must not feel well. This only magnifies my anxiety.”

“If I think about sweating, I’ll sweat, but then my anxiety starts because of the sweating, and then the sweating only gets worse. Once the cycle starts, I can’t stop it.”

“I’m an FBI agent. One day, I discovered that I was the one who was sweating during the interrogation of a suspect while he was cool and dry. This is just not right.”

“After a playing few bars during my first piano recital, I quit and walked away from the piano. The keys were wet with sweat. I’ll never forget that moment. Since that time, I haven’t played the piano.”

“My eyes burn after I inserted my sweat-stained contacts.”

“I’m so embarrassed by my sweaty hands that I don’t want to go with my husband to parties.”

You can read more here.

Areas effected by hyperhidrosis

PALMAR HYPERHIDROSIS: sweaty palms and sweaty hands

Palmar Hyperhidrosis or excessive sweating of the palms and hands is one of the most common manifestations of the condition. Caused by over-stimulation of the sweat glands in the palms, hand sweating can be severe and emotionally devastating. Some patients sweat so profusely that the sweat drips to the floor. Other patients suffer with hands that are discolored, cold and clammy. Handshakes are awkward, embarrassing. Reading a newspaper results in stained hands and smeared ink. Needlework can be impossible to manage.

While the sweating is involuntary and cannot be consciously controlled, many patients report a tingling in their fingers or a sensation that feels as if the skin pores are opening.

AXILLARY HYPERHIDROSIS: excessive underarm sweating

Axillary Hyperhidrosis is a medical condition caused by over stimulation of the underarm sweat glands by the sympathetic nervous system. Patients with Axillary Hyperhidrosis may suffer with excessive sweat dripping from their underarms, down their arms and side of chest wall to the waist.

Axillary sweating may occur independently or in combination with sweating of the hands, face, scalp or feet.

Patients with Axillary Hyperhidrosis cannot wear light colors or certain types of fabrics such as nylon or silk. Clothes become stained, colors may run, and fabrics may be ruined.

The sweating and odor associated with Axillary Hyperhidrosis is constant and resistant to all deodorants. Axillary Hyperhidrosis may even be resistant to Drysol®, the first line of therapy.

The Hyperhidrosis Disease Severity Scale (HDSS) is a four-point scale for categorizing the severity of primary Axillary Hyperhidrosis. The following scale, with 1 being mild and 4 being severe, is utilized to determine the degree of suffering:

1. Never noticeable and never interferes with my daily activities;

2. Tolerable but sometimes interferes with my daily activities;

3. Barely tolerable and frequently interferes with my daily activities; or

4. Intolerable and always interferes with my daily activities.


PEDAL HYPERHIDROSIS: the sweaty foot syndrome

Pedal Hyperhidrosis is defined as excessive sweating of the feet. This medical condition results from over stimulation of the sweat glands in the feet by the sympathetic nervous system. Unlike Hyperhidrosis that affects the hands and underarms, the sympathetic nerve fibers that stimulate sweating of the feet arise from both the thoracic and lumbar sympathetic nerve chains.


FACIAL HYPERHIDROSIS: facial blushing and sweating

Facial Hyperhidrosis is a genetic condition characterized by extreme facial blushing, excessive facial sweating or both. The condition is not related to a person being overweight. Persons with the condition oftentimes will avoid outdoor social functions, preferring to stay in cold rooms.

Facial blushing is an abnormal response to a variety of emotional stimuli and is caused by an over stimulation of the sympathetic nervous system. The mechanism is involuntary and aggravated or heightened by anxiety; however, it may occur without any stress or anxiety.

Physiologic blushing occurs in many individuals without Hyperhidrosis, with the blush occurring only in special situations, coming on quickly and fading rapidly. For persons with Hyperhidrosis, the blushing is intense, constant and continues for a prolonged period of time. Prior to the onset of the blushing, the person usually experiences intense facial heat. Then, the face and neck glow a bright red. The glow may spread across the cheeks, radiate onto the forehead and neck, even cover the ears.

Individuals who suffer from facial blushing respond to a multitude of stimuli with exaggerated blushing. The triggering stimulus may be internal or external, often being subtle. At times, persons with the condition experience several facial blushing even without any apparent stimuli while alone, relaxing, reading or watching a movie.

Facial blushing may occur independently or in combination with sweating of the hands, face and scalp, underarms or feet. The most common symptom occurring with facial blushing is severe hand sweating. Patients with several facial blushing often also suffer with some degree of palmar Hyperhidrosis. Typically, the patient will focus on his/her facial blushing, without being aware of the sweating hands.

Facial sweating may occur singularly or with the facial blushing. Slight increases in temperature and humidity are the stimulus for the condition. Man and women suffer with this condition. Facial sweating usually involves the entire scalp and face.

Persons with facial Hyperhidrosis find themselves soaked with sweat on the face and scalp during the most minimal of activities. Women with this condition usually opt for short hart and avoid makeup as the excessive sweating will case cosmetics to run.

What is hyperhidrosis?

Hyperhidrosis is a genetic condition that causes severe sweating and abnormal heat loss of the hands, underarms or feet. Individuals with Hyperhidrosis sweat to the point that their hands, feet or underarms are moist, clammy or literally dripping wet.

Hyperhidrosis is caused by a hyperactive Sympathetic Nervous System. The areas of the body that may be affected can occur in any combination, involving the face, underarms, hands and feet. The severe sweating from Hyperhidrosis may start with the beginning of each day and continue throughout the day and night or it may be intermittent.

A common misconception is that the excess sweating of Hyperhidrosis is due to severe anxiety, extreme shyness or emotional distress. However, persons with Hyperhidrosis sweat profusely even when calm, alone or resting. While the condition may be aggravated by anxiety, the disorder has its own trigger and the sweating can appear at any time.

However, there is usually an interrelationship between anxiety and sweating that develops to a greater or lesser degree in nearly all patients with severe Hyperhidrosis. Anxiety, while not a cause, can aggravate the condition. As the onset of symptoms is anxiety provoking, an individual who suffers with Hyperhidrosis anticipates the sweating, which in turn causes more sweating, creating a vicious cycle. Many individuals will try to escape by avoiding stressful or social situations.

Likewise, weight, hormonal imbalance or psychological disturbances are not factors related to the cause or cure of Hyperhidrosis. Persons of all sizes, physical conditions and mental well being suffer with the disorder.

While emotional wellness is not a factor in the cause, the excessive sweating that occurs can take a toll on the patient’s self confidence and relationships with others. Coping with Hyperhidrosis is difficult and many persons with the condition find themselves hiding their sweating from their closest of friends or partners and avoiding social contact.

Secondary Hyperhidrosis is a condition of Generalized Excessive Body Sweating. The cause of secondary Hyperhidrosis may be due to chronic infections, hyperthyroidism, autoimmune disorders, malignancy or other factors. A thyroid test is often recommended to people with excessive to verify that their Hyperhidrosis is not due to hyperthyroidism. The diagnosis and work-up of secondary Hyperhidrosis is usually made by a knowledgeable internist. This disorder is not responsive to surgical treatments for Hyperhidrosis.

Who suffers with hyperhidrosis?

In the United States, Hyperhidrosis affects one out of 30 individuals – or approximately twelve million Americans.

Hyperhidrosis affects both men and women, all races and every age group. One out of every30 Caucasians has Hyperhidrosis. Asians have an even higher rate of incidence with one of every five persons suffering from the condition.

At any stage of life, Hyperhidrosis presents difficult and humiliating situations for the sufferer.

Children or adolescents who suffer with Hyperhidrosis are particular vulnerable. As childhood is a time to build self-esteem, young people who are afflicted with Hyperhidrosis are especially at risk for developing inappropriate coping mechanisms. In middle or high school, a student with Hyperhidrosis usually finds that his or her peers misunderstand what the condition means. Frequently, a teenager will withdraw and distance himself or herself from potentially embarrassing situations. Furthermore, they can lose confidence in their abilities to interact with others.

Teenagers with Hyperhidrosis often will quit band, cheerleading, sports or even dating because of the embarrassment and ridicule from peers. The longer a teenager suffers with the condition, the greater the emotional fallout.

Adults with Hyperhidrosis are equally open to emotional distress. During conversations, sufferers may hide their hands under their arms, behind their backs or under their thighs.

Oftentimes individuals with the condition choose careers that eliminate social interaction. Even interviews or situations where shaking hands is expected are difficult.

Socially, adult patients report that during social gatherings, they often opt to constantly hold a cold drink so people would assume that their hand was cold and clammy because of the drink, not because of sweat.

© 2018 Handsdry.com